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Make a solar battery charger using solar plate voltage booster & TP4056 - KT781

Make a solar battery charger using solar plate voltage booster & TP4056 - KT781

SKU:KT781

1000 in stock

Regular price Rs. 950.00
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KIT INCLUDES:


HARDWARE REQUIRED

SPECIFICATIONS

.TP4056 BATTERY PROTECTION BOARD

  • Input voltage - 5V via microUSB or solder pads on left-hand side of module
  • Full charge voltage - 4.2V
  • Charging current - 1A by default. However you can change this by changing the 1k2 resistor next to the "IN-" pad the bottom-left of the board. See the Rprog table on page three of the TP4056 data sheet for different values and matching charging currents



PROJECT DESCRIPTION

There are two LEDs on board one red and one blue. The red one comes on when it is charging and the blue one comes on when the charging is done. Then there is this mini USB connector to charge the battery from an external USB charger. There are also these two points where you can solder your own charging unit. These points are marked as IN- and IN+ We will be utilizing these two point to power this board. The battery will be connected to these two point marked as BAT+ and BAT- (pretty mush self-explanatory) The board requires an input voltage of 4.5 to 5.5v to charge the battery

There are two versions of this board available in the market. One with battery discharge protection module and one without it. Both boards offer 1A charging current and then cut off when finished.

Furthermore, the one with protection switches the load off when the battery voltage drops below 2.4V to protect the cell from running at too low (such as on a cloudy day) - and also protects against over-voltage and reverse polarity connection (it will usually destroy itself instead of the battery) however please check you have it connected correctly the first time.

Copper Legs

These boards gets really hot so we will be soldering them a bit above the circuit board.

To achieve this we use a hard copper wire to make legs of the circuit board. We will then be sliding the unit on the legs and will solder them all together. Put 4 copper wires to make 4 legs of this circuit board. You can also use - Male Breakable Pin Headers instead of the copper wire to achieve this.



CIRCUIT CONNECTION

The solar cell is connected to the TP4056 battery charging board's IN+ and IN- respectively. A diode is inserted at the positive end for the reverse voltage protection. Then the BAT+ and BAT- of the board is connected to the positive and negative ends of the battery. (That all we need for charging the battery). Now to power an Arduino board we need to boost up the output to 5v. So, we are adding a 5v voltage booster to this circuit. Connect the negative end of the battery to the IN- of the booster and positive to IN+ by adding a switch in between. OK, now let’s have a look at what I have made. - I have connected the booster board straight to the charger however I will recommend putting a SPDT switch there. So when the device is charging the battery it’s only charging and not getting used

Solar cells are connected to the input of the lithium battery charger (TP4056), whose output is connected to the 18560 lithium battery. A 5V step-up voltage booster is also connected to the battery and is used to convert from 3.7V dc to 5V dc.

Charging voltage is typically around 4.2V. Voltage booster's input ranges from 0.9 to 5.0V. So it will see around 3.7V at its input when the battery is discharging, and 4.2V when it's recharging. The output of the booster to the rest of the circuit will keep its 5V value.

WORKING

This project will be very helpful to power a remote data logger. As we know, the power supply is always a problem for a remote logger and most of the times there is no power outlet available. A situation like that forces you to use some batteries to power your circuit. But eventually, the battery will die. Question is do you want to go there and charge the battery? Our inexpensive solar charger project will be an excellent solution for a situation like this to power an Arduino board.

This project can also solve the efficiency issue of Arduino when in sleep. Sleep saves battery, however, the sensors and power regulators (7805) will still consume battery in idle mode draining the battery. By charging the battery as we use it, we can solve our problem.